CRS Scholarships and Bursaries

CRS supports a scholarship and bursary for refugee students, students without status and graduate students researching refugee issues. All awards are listed on York’s Scholarship website: https://sfs.yorku.ca/scholarships/award-search (an easy way to find them is to enter “refugee” in the Award Name/Keyword field).

 

CRS Bursary for Refugee Students

Offered: In-Course (Fall)

Award Type: Bursary

No. of Awards: Minimum of 1 per year

Value: $1,500

Description:

The CRS Bursary for Refugee Students supports entering or continuing undergraduate students who do not have an immigration status in Canada: who are asylum seekers, who are in the process of making a refugee claim or are applying for permanent residence status under humanitarian and compassionate grounds and who have demonstrated financial need. In the absence of any eligible non status application in a given year, the award may be given to a refugee student with Convention Refugee or Protected Person status.

Application Process:

To apply for this award, applicants must fill out a Fall/Winter Financial Profile (SFP) online at http://sfs.yorku.ca/services/sfp. Applicants must also submit a copy of one of the following:

  1. Notice of Decision letter from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada stating that their pending refugee claim or alternately stating their pending claim for permanent residence status under humanitarian and compassionate grounds.
  2. Official notice confirming the student’s Convention Refugee or Protected Person status. Documentation should be addressed to the attention of Scholarships and Bursaries, and submitted via the Financial Services drop box in the lobby of the Bennett Centre for Student Service.

The Anthony H. Richmond Scholarship

Offered: In-Course (Winter)

Award Type: Scholarship

No. of Awards: Minimum of 1 per year

Value: $2,000

Application Deadline: October 31

Description:

The Anthony H. Richmond Scholarship will be awarded annually to a graduate level student conducting research on interactions between: i) refugees, forced migration, immigration and/or resettlement within or outside counties of origin and ii) the environment.

Created by Freda Richmond in memory of her husband, Anthony (Tony) Richmond, Professor Emeritus at York University and one of the founders of York’s Department of Sociology.  He established the department’s graduate program and served as its first director, and he was also a founding member of the York Centre for Refugee Studies.  In 1980, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.  Richmond was known for his civility, lack of pretense, sense of fairness and commitment to scholarly life, as well as his consistent encouragement to women scholars in sociology.  Richmond’s academic interests began in Britain with studies in race relations and moved on to migration studies when he first came to Canada, before focussing in the latter part of his career on refugees and refugee policy.  His lifelong Quakerism fuelled his concern for inequities of all kinds.  In his final book, “Global Apartheid: Refugees, Racism and the New World Order” (published in 1994) Richmond examined the repressive and restrictive policies ‘White’ and wealthy countries had instituted to restrain the number of migrant workers and refugees from developing countries – describing the result as a form of Global Apartheid.

Selection:

Awarded annually to a graduate level student conducting research on interactions between:

i) refugees, forced migration, immigration and/or resettlement within or outside counties of origin and

ii) the environment. 

Students must demonstrate empirical research in their work while also focusing on the impact the environment has on people. First preference will be given to students studying forced migration arising from environmental changes such as climate change, flooding, drought, forest fires, and land or sanitary degradation.These may also include studies on policies developed as a result of forced migration. If no student meets the first preference, then the award will be given to a student researching a second preference, namely the interactions between forced migration and either political, economic, social or other factors as they relate to refugees. The award will be adjudicated by the Centre for Refugee Studies.

Eligibility:

The student must be enrolled in a graduate program at York University (either Master’s or PhD) conducting research on interactions between refugees, forced migration, immigration and/or resettlement within or outside counties of origin and the environment. 

Application Process: