Book Launch: Transitional Justice and Forced Migration: Critical Perspectives from the Global South

When:
January 25, 2021 @ 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
2021-01-25T14:00:00-05:00
2021-01-25T15:30:00-05:00

Guest Speaker: Nergis Canefe, Associate Professor, Department of Politics and CRS Scholar, York University

Transitional Justice and Forced Migration: Critical Perspectives from the Global South

https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/transitional-justice-and-forced-migration/B2B65D943C5E568C54AF5BC5B1A09F3E

This volume brings together critical legal scholarship and theories of forced migration that draw attention to the dual role of law as it pertains to transitional justice and mass violence resulting in forced population movements. Contributors to the volume analyze how forced migration in the Global South have impacted contemporary realities. While there has been considerable focus on refugees and asylum seekers from conflict zones, there is less attention paid to the far more numerous internally displaced peoples (IDPs), stateless people, warehoused refugees, non-status displaced and returnees in the Global South. In this volume, a multidisciplinary group of scholars question the reasons behind the restrictive choices that lock us into area studies modalities instead of genuine interdisciplinary analysis by linking the traditional subject matter of transitional justice with the realities of forced migration in the Global South.

Crimes Against Humanity: The Limits of Universal Jurisdiction in the Global South

(forthcoming July 2021)

https://www.amazon.ca/Crimes-Against-Humanity-Universal-Jurisdiction/dp/1786837021

Currently, there is an engorging fascination with and heightened expectations from international legal accountability. Crimes Against Humanity examines whether international criminal law, in particular legislation and institutions pertaining to war crimes and crimes against humanity, is equipped to be a panacea for the ills of the recalcitrant nation-state system. The main thread that runs through the text is to determine the ultimate aim and efficacy of adjudicating some of the most egregious infractions of the internationally sanctioned human rights regime. While international criminal law strives to develop a shared understanding of, and golden standards for, acceptable behavior of states and governments, it also suffers from a degree of institutional idealism pertaining to current accountability regimes in public international law. Focusing on the Global South, it also examines the problem-laden notion of collective responsibility for societal and political mass crimes and questions the merits of disproportionate reliance on international criminal law in the aftermath of civil wars, ethnic cleansing, genocidal violence, and mass exodus.

Professor Nergis Canefe (PhD & SJD) is a Turkish-Canadian scholar of public international law, comparative politics, forced migration studies and critical human rights. She has held posts in several European and Turkish Universities and is a faculty member at York University, Canada since 2003. She regularly serves at the executive board of several international organizations, including International Association of Forced Migration Studies, and is the co-editor of Journal of Conflict Transformation and Security. She penned close to 100 scholarly articles and several books, Transitional Justice and Forced Migration (edited volume, 2019, Cambridge University Press), The Syrian Exodus (monograph, 2018, Bilgi University), The Jewish Diaspora as a Paradigm: Politics, Religion and Belonging (edited volume, 2014, Libra Press –Jewish Studies Series), Milliyetcilik, Kimlik ve Aidiyet (monograph, 2006, Nationalism, Identity and Belonging], Istanbul: Bilgi University Publishing House), and Turkey and European Integration: Accession Prospects and Issues (2004, edited volume in collaboration with Mehmet Ugur, Routledge). Her most recent book is Limits of Universal Jurisdiction: A Critical Debate on Crimes against Humanity (University of Wales International Law Series, in press), to be followed by a volume on Unorthodox Minorities in the Middle East (Lexington Press) and Comparative Politics of Administrative Law in the Middle East (Macmillan Publishers). Her scholarly work appeared in Nations and Nationalism, Citizenship Studies, New Perspectives, Refugee Watch, Refuge, South East European Studies, Peace Review, Middle Eastern Law and Governance, Journal of International Human Rights, and, Narrative Politics. Professor Canefe is also a trained artist and her designs and murals have been showcased regularly since 2008.

Register in advance for this meeting:
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