Calendar

Jan
14
Mon
2019
CRS Seminar: Peter Nyers, Omer Ozcan, The Graduate Sociology Workshop @ 519 Kaneff Tower
Jan 14 @ 11:30 PM – Jan 15 @ 2:30 AM

The Graduate Sociology Workshop

                   – Presents –

Peter Nyers

Irregular Citizenship, Immigration, and Deportation

Omer Ozcan

Enforced Disappearance: A Stretched-out Present and Unending Grief

January 14, 2019  |  11:30 AM – 2:20 PM  |   Kaneff Tower 519

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Refugee Studies, Department of Sociology, Centre for Public Sociology, Department of Anthropology and Graduate Program in Sociology.

Peter Nyers is a University Scholar and Associate Professor of the Politics of Citizenship and Intercultural Relations in the Department of Political Science at McMaster University.

The talk is based on Nyers’ recent book, which brings deportation and anti-deportation together with the aim of understanding the political subjects that emerge in this contested field of governance and control, freedom and struggle. Rather than focusing on the typical subjects of removal – refugees, the undocumented and irregular migrants – Irregular Citizenship, Immigration and Deportation looks at the ways that citizens get caught up in the deportation apparatus and must struggle to remain in or return to their country of citizenship. The transformation of ‘regular’ citizens into deportable ‘irregular’ citizens involves the removal of the rights, duties, and obligations of citizenship. This includes unmaking citizenship through official revocation or denationalization, as well as through informal, extra-legal, and unofficial means. The book features stories about struggles over removal and return, deportation and repatriation, rescue and abandonment.

Omer Ozcan is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and affiliated with the Department of Sociology and Centre for Refugee Studies at York University.

This talk concerns the practices of waiting that occur when people are placed outside of the protection of the law. I trace life stories of Halit and Eyşan, a displaced elderly Kurdish couple, to discuss how the counterinsurgency practice of enforced disappearance, a distinct exercise of sovereign power, produces a specific form of waiting, which I call enforced waiting. I examine temporal effects of the prolonged armed conflict between the Turkish state and Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) on everyday life in Yuksekova where violence is not always instantaneous or spectacular but often gradual and uneventful. I argue that waiting in Kurdistan is intrinsic to sovereign practices and it is the embodiment of continuous and uneventful violence that suffuses across time and space.

Jan
31
Thu
2019
CRS Seminar: Subalterity in Education within the Context of Displacement: From Ideology to Practice @ 280N York Lanes
Jan 31 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

With guest speaker

Ranu Basu, Associate Professor, Department of Geography, York University

Feb
13
Wed
2019
CRS Seminar: Displacement and Dispossession through Land Acquisition: Kerala Experience @ 305 York Lanes
Feb 13 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Guest speaker: Bushra Beegom, Assistant Professor in Sociology, University of Kerala (India) 

India is a land of human displacement as it is going through various phases of development.  More than sixty million people have been displaced since independence due to infrastructural and various developmental projects.  People are deprived of their livelihood, resources and amenities due to land acquisition for development projects which effects radical changes in the existing power structure, community consciousness and social relations of the affectees in the region. Beyond that the cultural and psychological trauma associated with human displacement is endless. As it is a developing country, acquisition of land for implementing development project is inevitable. India followed until recently the draconian Land Acquisition Act of 1894 which permitted acquisition of land for public purposes.   Even though there are amendments made to the Act and in 2013 a new Act was formulated for land acquisition and rehabilitation, there are still many problems faced by the people in association with human displacement and debates on  ‘public purpose and fair compensation’ still goes on.  Concepts like resettlement or rehabilitation have been neither properly perceived nor fulfilled in the proposed or finished projects.  With the emergence of private sector and capitalistic aims, this augmented the deprivation and disruption of socio cultural structure.  There are many issues related to land acquisition, fair compensation and rehabilitation of affectees. I examine the Indian experience of displacement, resettlement and rehabilitation by selecting two cases in the southernmost state in India, Kerala. The case of the Vizhinjam International Fishing Harbour project deserves global attention. The second one is the ICTT Project (International Container Transhipment Terminal). I intend to present the history of the projects, nature and extent of people displaced, challenges associated with ‘fair’ compensation and the failure of social policy to recognise the problems of affectees. The finding explicitly shows how the state perpetuates and shapes the lives of marginalised people.

Bushra Beegom is an Assistant Professor in Sociology at the University of Kerala (India) .  Her research interests are in the sociology of development, development induced displacement, and rehabilitation of affectees .  She was the Director of a research project funded by the Indian Council of Social Science Research and University Grants Commission, India.  She also explored gendered dimensions of displacement and the rehabilitation of women specifically.

Feb
27
Wed
2019
CRS Seminar: Humanitarian Series I @ 626 Kaneff Tower
Feb 27 @ 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Hernan Delvalle, Rita E. Hauser Fellow, Harvard University and Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (Netherlands)

Borders, migration, exclusion: The role of civil society and humanitarian aid in an increasingly polarized political context

The increase in border restrictions for asylum seekers and migrants raises pressing moral, legal, and political questions. How to respond to human migration has become one of the most divisive political issues of our time.  Through the experience of MSF’s operations at sea and on land assisting asylum seekers and migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the panel will explore how the plight of people on the move has been weaponized to serve a variety of political agendas. We will discuss how civil society, state institutions and political leaders struggle to define narratives to influence policy and public debate. This timely discussion should help us shed light on the dilemmas that emerge for societies both in Europe and in the Americas.

Hernan will offer an overview of the rise and fall of civilian-led operations to rescue asylum seekers and migrants in the Mediterranean between the years 2014 and 2018. Drawing on Hernan’s experience in MSF throughout this operation, we will explore the complex relationship between NGOs and state authorities at the southern European maritime border. We will see how the humanitarian deployment to ‘save lives’ came under fire for ‘aiding illegal immigration’ amidst a polarization of the political debate and growing pressures to ‘secure the border’ and prevent asylum seekers from reaching Europe. 

The case explores the challenges for civil society organizations assisting people marginalized by state border policy, and raises critically urgent questions around solidarity, identity, belonging, nationalism, xenophobia, and exclusion 

Hernan del Valle has led humanitarian aid operations for the past 15 years. His work has taken him across five continents assisting people affected by armed conflict and forced displacement. He was involved in Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) operations in the Mediterranean Sea, which over the past three years rescued tens of thousands of refugees and migrants fleeing Libya toward Europe in fragile boats. As MSF’s head of humanitarian affairs and advocacy, del Valle was a privileged witness to the difficult political challenges that emerged for MSF throughout this operation, not only in its relation with European governments but also engaging with a civil society bitterly divided by debates on migration.

His work at Radcliffe reflects on the role of and challenges for MSF in assisting people marginalized by state policy in this context. It explores the fundamental questions that emerge around borders, exclusion, identity, nationalism, citizenship, and fundamental rights in contemporary Europe.

Del Valle is a lawyer who specialized in international law and human rights at the University of Buenos Aires, in Argentina. He holds a master’s degree in politics of development from the London School of Economics and Political Science and has conducted work in forced migration at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in South Africa. He has been a guest speaker on the politics of aid and forced migration at Boston University, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Oxford, the University of Tokyo, and the University of Vienna.

Mar
6
Wed
2019
CRS Seminar: Humanitarian Series II @ 280N York Lanes
Mar 6 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Linn Biorklund Belliveau, Researcher/analyst Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research and Médecins Sans Frontières, CRS Affiliated Scholar

Borders, migration, exclusion: The role of civil society and humanitarian aid in an increasingly polarized political context

Linn will discuss how migration can be weaponized to serve diverse political agendas, including the growing tendency to frame refugees and migrants as political liabilities. The result is a degradation of access to adequate protection and humanitarian assistance, as well as the mechanisms they use to reach target destinations. Linn will present this perspective using first-hand experience working with Eritrean refugees fleeing towards the shores of Europe between 2013 – 2016 and sharing a critical perspective of State and humanitarian responses to the so-called ‘migrant-caravans’ from the Northern Triangle of Central America to the United States and Canada.  

Linn Biorklund Belliveau is a researcher/analyst, presently at Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research and at Médecins Sans Frontières. Affiliated to the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University. Specific areas of knowledge include forced migration, transnational networks, border externalization, and climate politics. Extensive experience with non-governmental organizations and the UN in the fields of humanitarianism and human rights. Worked in a wide range of countries in East Africa, Middle East and Latin America. Political Science degree from Stockholm University and a Master’s degree in International Relations from Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona.

Mar
14
Thu
2019
CRS Seminar: The Role of Family in Constructions of the ‘Desirable’ Canadian Refugee @ 519 Kaneff Tower
Mar 14 @ 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

With guest speaker:

Megan Gaucher, Assistant Professor, Department of Law and Legal Studies, Carleton University

Mar
20
Wed
2019
CRS AGM and Anniversary Event @ 519 Kaneff Tower
Mar 20 @ 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

AGM and anniversary event

Details to follow

Apr
2
Tue
2019
CRS Seminar: Crisis, what (refugee) crisis? The business of ‘business-as-usual’ in EU migration governance @ 519 Kaneff Tower
Apr 2 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

With guest speaker:

Emma Carmel, Senior Lecturer, Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath

This presentation examines how the idea of  ‘the refugee crisis’ emerged at a specific historical moment in the European Union, what happened to this idea and why it matters. Using tools of policy anthropology I show how the idea of ‘the refugee crisis’ has given meaning and impetus to specific governing practices that disguise the political and moral economies of ‘business-as-usual’ migration governance in the EU. The idea of ‘the refugee crisis’ was adopted as a political strategy that calcifies structural inequalities between states, and between private market actors and ‘the Union’; and patterns of exclusion, detention, exploitation and expulsion for migrants.

Dr Carmel works at the intersection of sociology, political economy and politics, researching  the social and political dynamics of public policy governance. Her recent work examines the transnational governance of migration in the European Union and its implications for socio-political inequalities. She is starting work on the normalization of digital governance as an everyday governmental practice.

Apr
4
Thu
2019
Refugee Rights Day in Canada @ , 014 McLaughlin College, Junior Common Room
Apr 4 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Panelists to be confirmed

Co-Sponsored with McLaughlin College