Calendar

Nov
6
Mon
2017
Refugees Welcome Here! Winter Coat and Clothing Collection
Nov 6 – Dec 5 all-day
Now Until December 5th!

 
As part of the York University Refugees Welcome Here! campaign we are collecting coats and winter clothing to support local immigrants and refugees at the FCJ Refugee Centre to (literally!) help give a warmer welcome to our community.
 
We are also tabling to raise awareness of refugee issues and invite students to join this campaign. WUSC York – Keele, Amnesty International at York (AIY), York University Syria Response and Refugee Initiative , Islamic Relief at York University, RefugeAid and the McLaughlin College Council are collaborating and helping with the collection of these coats.
 
Coats may be dropped off at Room 107, McLaughlin College OR McLaughlin College Council or when the respective organizations are tabling until December 5th.
 
To join the Refugees Welcome Here! campaign please contact us at refwelc@yorku.ca and fill in our questionnaire at https://goo.gl/forms/IZwi7T9XSKuIhCA53 !
 
The York University Syria Response and Refugee Initiative is providing logistical support. Please visit our site at www.yorku.ca/refugees to learn more and to get involved!
 
You can learn more about and follow the FCJ Refugee Centre at http://www.fcjrefugeecentre.org/ .
Nov
8
Wed
2017
CRS Seminar: ‘Refugee Law’s Fact-Finding Crisis: Truth, Risk, and the Wrong Mistake @ 626 Kaneff Tower
Nov 8 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Guest speaker: Hilary Evans Cameron

How should an adjudicator decide whether a refugee claimant’s evidence is trustworthy?  In a context of profound uncertainty, how should these decisions be structured and how can they be justified? This talk provides an overview of a decade of interdisciplinary research into these questions, culminating in a proposal for a new legal model of refugee status decision-making.

Dr. Evans Cameron practiced refugee law for a decade, representing claimants before the Immigration and Refugee Board and the Federal Court. Her research explores decision-making in the refugee determination context with a focus on credibility assessment. She has published two articles on this topic in the International Journal of Refugee Law, one of which was included in a leading anthology of the “the finest scholarship available” in refugee law from the 1930s to the present (Hathaway 2014). She has also written on the right of Canadian children to challenge their parents’ deportations in Federal Court (UBC Law Review), on legal pedagogy (Journal of Law and Social Policy), and on the standard of judicial review (Canadian Journal of Administrative Law and Practice). The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees relies on her research, and invited her to Europe to participate in a UN Expert Roundtable on Credibility Determination. Dr. Evans Cameron recently went to Sweden to assist renowned lie detection researcher Dr. Pär Anders Granhag and a team of cognitive psychologists attempting to improve credibility assessment in the Swedish refugee system. She is an instructor at Trinity College, a Visiting Associate at the University of Toronto’s Centre for Ethics, and an Adjunct Professor and SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School. Her upcoming book about the law of fact-finding in refugee status decision-making (Refugee Law’s Fact-finding Crisis: Truth, Risk, and the Wrong Mistake) will be published in 2018 by Cambridge University Press.

 

Nov
14
Tue
2017
WE STAND WITH REFUGEES: Canadian Policies, Myanmar Displacement & Student Engagement @ York University Senate Chamber, Ross N940
Nov 14 @ 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Nov
21
Tue
2017
CRS Seminar: “Step into the Past”: Institutionalizing Performances of Immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax, Nova Scotia @ 626 Kaneff Tower
Nov 21 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Guest Speaker: Morgan Poteet

Visiting Scholar at Centre for Refugee Studies, York University

Co-author: Andrea Terry, Lakehead University

This presentation is based on an institutional history and analysis of recent guided tour programming offered at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, exploring its simultaneous dependence on and entrenchment of volunteerism. Based on an analysis of the motivations and achievements of volunteer collectives, guided tours and interpreter interviews, we approach Pier 21 as an example of “heritage as performance” (Smith, 2006). Exploring the site as the result of memory-making processes indicates tensions between bottom-up activities mounted by local community members and state-sanctioned heritage designation policies, as well as national(ized) narratives.  

Smith, Laurajane. 2006. Uses of Heritage. London and New York: Routledge.

Morgan Poteet has conducted research on belonging for Central American youth in Toronto and international students in the Atlantic region of Canada, youth-police relations in New Brunswick, and refugee integration in Scotland, UK and Atlantic Canada. Poteet teaches courses on immigration and settlement in the Department of Sociology at Mt. Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. He is Past President of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS), currently Director at Large on the CARFMS Executive, and a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), York University, Toronto.

Challenging Trafficking in Canada Policy Brief Launch @ 519 Kaneff Tower
Nov 21 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

The Centre for Feminist Research and the Centre for Refugee Studies Present:

Challenging Trafficking in Canada Policy Brief Launch

519 Kaneff Tower, York University
Tuesday, November 21, 2017
4-5.30pm

Challenging Trafficking in Canada presents information about human trafficking interventions as they impact sex workers, Indigenous women, migrants, youth, and other marginalized groups. Drawing from established research and consultations with organizations around the country, the policy brief analyses how anti-trafficking policies, laws and practices often cause violence and harm to those they are intended to help, especially Indigenous, racialized and migrant sex workers. It offers an alternative to misinformation, exaggerations and unfounded claims that often circulate through the media and public discussion.

Join us for a conversation with community organizers about the Brief and how issues of labour exploitation, criminalization, and precarious migration status impact local and migrant workers across multiple industries.

Lead editors of the policy brief:
Dr. Kamala Kempadoo & Nicole D. McFadyen (PhD Candidate), York University

Panelists:
Elene Lam, Director
Butterfly: Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support Network

Syed Hussan, Coordinator
Migrant Workers Alliance for Change

Evelyn Encalada Grez, Organizer and co-Founder
Justicia for Migrant Workers

Andrea Sterling, Board Chair
Maggie’s Toronto Sex Workers Action Project

About the panelists:
Elene Lam (LLM, LLB, MSW. BSW) Master of Law is the founder and executive director of Butterfly (Asian and migrant sex workers support network) and Migrant Sex Workers Project (MSWP). She has been involved in the sex work, gender, migrant and labour movement and activism for more than 17 years.

Evelyn Encalada Grez is co-founder of the award-winning collective Justicia for Migrant Workers. She was part of the films “Migrant Dreams” and “El Contrato” directed by Min Sook Lee that features the injustices lived by migrant workers in Canada. She is contract faculty at York University and a PhD candidate in Social Justice Education at OISE of the University of Toronto.

Andrea Sterling is a PhD candidate in the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is currently the Chair of the Board of Maggie’s: Toronto Sex Workers’ Action Project, and has been involved with sex working communities in Montréal and Toronto since 2006. Andrea was involved in the development of the policy brief as a contributing member of the editorial and research teams representing Maggie’s Toronto. Her research examines sex work and modes of regulation and is guided by the lived realities of sex workers in her community.

Supported by: Maggie’s Toronto
Sponsored by: Centre for Feminist Research, Centre for Refugee Studies, Department of Anthropology, Department of Social Science & International Development Studies at York University.

Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca. Light refreshments provided.

Dec
7
Thu
2017
CRS Seminar: The Plight of the Rohingyas: Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide and Refugee Crisis @ 280N York Lanes
Dec 7 @ 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Guest Speaker: Nasir Uddin,University of Chittagong

The Rohingyas, widely known as the most persecuted people in the world, have recently encountered thousands of indiscriminate killings, hundreds of horrific raping and random burning of hundreds of villages perpetrated by the Myanmar security forces and extremist Buddhist nationalists in what the United Nations Human Rights Council termed ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’. In the name of counter-insurgency operations, Myanmar security forces committed an unprecedented violence which forced more than 600,000 Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh in addition to existing 500,000, which created ‘the biggest refugee crises’ and ‘a humanitarian catastrophe’ in the near past. The intensity of brutality and the degree of atrocity was so dreadful that many international rights bodies (Amnesty International, and Human Rights Watch) and acclaimed media outlets (Al Zajeera, The New York Times, ABC News, BBC, and CNN) called it “genocide”.     

Why the Rohingyas experience genocide, ethnic cleansing and critical refugee situation is due to their stateless identity in Myanmar apart from their ethno-linguistic and religious difference from the national majority. The Rohingyas were made stateless in 1982 enacting ‘Myanmar Citizenship Law’ which legally rendered them non-citizens; a vulnerable category belonging to no state. In that sense, the Rohingyas are non-existent human beings as they do not exist in the legal framework of any state. Therefore, they frequently experience persecution, atrocities and everyday forms of discrimination as they are dealt with as if they are less than human beings, in what Uddin prefers to phrase as ‘sub-human’. This talk, with empirically grounded evidences and recent experiences of ethnic cleansing, genocide, and refugee situation, will focus on the plight of Rohingyas in the borderland of Myanmar and Bangladesh

Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh and a professor of anthropology at the University of Chittagong. His research interests include statelessness and refugee studies; human rights and non-citizens; indigeneity and identity politics; the state in everyday life; the politics of marginality and vulnerability; and borderlands and border people, particularly those of Bangladesh and Myanmar, the Chittagong Hill Tracts, and South Asia. His publications include To Host or To Hurt: Counter-narratives on the Rohingya (Refugees) in Bangladesh (2012); Life in Peace and Conflict: Indigeneity and State in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (2017) and Indigeneity on the Move: Varying Manifestation of a Contested Concept (2017). Currently he is working on a monograph, the Rohingyas: A Tale of Sub-Human (2018).

Dec
12
Tue
2017
CRS Special Lecture: Refugee and Migrant Labour and the Population Question under Global Capitalism @ 305 York Lanes
Dec 12 @ 2:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Guest Speaker:

Ranabir Samaddar, Distinguished Chair in Migration and Forced Migration Studies, Calcutta Research Group in Kolkata India and currently the O’Brien Residency Fellow, McGill University

Abstract

Most writings on refugee economy or the immigrant economy refer to changes in the immigrant labour absorption policies of the Western governments. In these writings the refugee economy or the immigrant economy never features directly; refugees are seen as economic actors in the market. But we do not get a full picture of why capitalism in late twentieth or early twenty first century needs these refugee or immigrant labour as economic actors. The organic link between the immigrant as an economic actor and the global capitalist economy seems to escape the analysis in these writings. Yet, if immigration policies produce precarious labour, this has general significance for the task of theorising the migrant as living labour. The question of the production of living labour is important because it puts in a critical perspective the necessity of the states and the international regime of protection to synchronise the economic and the political strategies of protection. Yet the disjuncture between the two strategies of protection is not only typical of the postcolonial parts of the globe, the disjuncture is evident in the developed countries. Globally, one can say, capital sets in motion movements of labour within a specific field of force that dictates how and why migrant labour is to be harnessed, disciplined, and governed (for instance the dominant presence of immigrant labour in logistics, health care, agriculture, etc.), and that shapes the links between “strategies” (that control migrants once they are in motion) and the mechanisms that set these movements in motion. 

Hence the ambiguous position the category of the forced migrant occupies in the organisation of the reality called population and its division in various categories.  While governing people has become possible by turning population groups into administrative categories, yet the category of migrant, the footloose labour, or the forced migrant escapes these adminstrative categorisations. As migrant labour, they show that management of migrant labour is not simply a matter of rule, sovereignty, and management. Performing labour as parts of wandering bands of construction labour, or labour in sex, care, and entertainment industry,  various logistical services, petty shops and outlets, and various other sites of production, social subsistence, and social reproduction, the refugee or the migrant becomes the labouring subject of the capitalism of our time. They become one of the defining elements of the organisation of populations under global capitalism today. 

Biography 

Ranabir Samaddar belongs to the critical school of thinking and is considered as one of the foremost theorists in the field of migration and forced migration studies. His writings have signaled a new turn in critical postcolonial thinking. His co-authored work on new town and new forms of accumulation Beyond Kolkata: Rajarhat and the Dystopia of Urban Imagination (Routledge, 2014) takes forward urban studies in the context of post-colonial capitalism. Karl Marx and the Postclonial Age (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017) is his latest work discussing the relevance of Marx in the global age of postcolonialism and neoliberalism. He is currently the Distinguished Chair in Migration and Forced Migration Studies, Calcutta Research Group.